Author Topic: 68 Shelby GT-500 Convertible Project and Retrospective  (Read 1460 times)

BIGBLOCKHEAD and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

cjshaker

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2165
    • View Profile
Re: 68 Shelby GT-500 Convertible Project and Retrospective
« Reply #45 on: October 13, 2017, 07:38:29 AM »
Well Doug, the people I know in my area who have done these sorts of restorations warned me off of dry blasting with sand, due to the heat buildup and coarser sand used, which tends to warp panels.  The only real good alternative was blasting with plastic media, but that meant transporting the car to another location, which I didn't want to do.  The blasting I had done did not warp anything at all, so I'm happy with that part of the process.  Also, I'm not buying your claim that the sand holds moisture.  I've seen no evidence of that in my car, or any evidence of the sand building up or caking anywhere.  And I'm also not buying the idea that a dry blasting of the car would let me get sand out any easier.  That enclosed area under the cowl vents is going to hold some sand no matter what, I think.  The local guys I know have all used the dustless blasting process, with good results.  The only real complaint I have about it is the start of a little rust in areas where I previously welded, and I was able to take care of that pretty easily.

Sand doesn't hold moisture? Ever looked at a sand box, a beach, or just a pile of sand anywhere? Not trying to be a smartass, but sand does hold moisture...period. I sandblast my own parts (I have a 10 gallon rolling sandblasting unit from TIP and a beadblasting cabinet), and I have to keep the sand dry or it will start to clog in my blaster. It will even gather moisture while sitting in my blaster. That's why bags of sandblasting sand are plastic lined, to limit the moisture absorbed.

The problem with sand coagulating with moisture is that it happens in areas that you can't see. Visible areas are easily flushed and blown dry, but you can't do that inside of frame rails and cowl areas without extended blow guns with long flexible tips, which I also use with dry sand. If you've ever had cars from the west or east coast areas, these things become immediately apparent. I'm not just guessing here.

It's true that sand will warp panels if you're not very careful, that's why it's best to chemical strip or plastic/walnut blast any outer sheetmetal. But I do understand that that is much more work than a total blasting process.

A rotisserie is by far the best way to remove it all, and a rubber mallet helps to tap on panels and loosen any sand that gets stuck or wedged into seams. It's a long process to remove it all, and it sucks, but if it isn't totally removed it WILL come back to haunt you when it's time to paint.

Just my experience from somebody who's not trying to sell you anything  :)
Doug Smith

'69 R-code Mach 1, 1965 427 MR Sideoiler 2x4, 4-spd Toploader, 4.30 Detroit Locker
2 1965 Galaxies with 390s
1970 F-350 390
1958 Ford Ranch Wagon 390

jayb

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5454
    • View Profile
    • FE Power
Re: 68 Shelby GT-500 Convertible Project and Retrospective
« Reply #46 on: October 13, 2017, 08:38:13 AM »
As far as I can tell there's not enough sand left anywhere in the car to hold moisture.  Its all in cracks and crevices.  By the way, the frame rails and rocker panels in my car have not been sealed up yet; they are open on the ends.  So I can look inside in most spots and see that they are clean.  Also, I plugged those openings for the blasting process, to avoid an excessive amount of sand getting in there.  Sticking with my story on this one  ;)
Jay Brown
- 1969 Mach 1, Drag Week 2005 Winner NA/BB, 511" FE (10.60s @ 129); Drag Week 2007 Runner-Up PA/BB, 490" Supercharged FE (9.35 @ 151)
- 1964 Ford Galaxie, Drag Week 2009 Winner Modified NA (9.50s @ 143), 585" SOHC
- 1969 Shelby Clone, Drag Week 2015 Winner Modified NA (Average 8.98 @ 149), 585" SOHC

   

fe-starliner

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 16
    • View Profile
Re: 68 Shelby GT-500 Convertible Project and Retrospective
« Reply #47 on: October 13, 2017, 08:41:29 AM »
Correct me if I'm wrong....but Jay stated the Dustless Blasting process uses ground up glass, not sand.  Maybe he's using the term "sand" but meaning the fine, ground glass, which should not coagulate with water.
1960 Starliner, 406-6V, TKO-600, 4.11 9"
1961 Starliner, 427 4V, SS700 5 speed, 4.56 9"
1968 F-100 SWB, 352 4V, C6, 3.25 9"
2012 Mustang, 226" V6, 6 speed auto, 3.31 8.8"

jayb

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5454
    • View Profile
    • FE Power
Re: 68 Shelby GT-500 Convertible Project and Retrospective
« Reply #48 on: October 13, 2017, 09:48:48 AM »
That is correct, it is glass, not sand.  Looks like sand though...
Jay Brown
- 1969 Mach 1, Drag Week 2005 Winner NA/BB, 511" FE (10.60s @ 129); Drag Week 2007 Runner-Up PA/BB, 490" Supercharged FE (9.35 @ 151)
- 1964 Ford Galaxie, Drag Week 2009 Winner Modified NA (9.50s @ 143), 585" SOHC
- 1969 Shelby Clone, Drag Week 2015 Winner Modified NA (Average 8.98 @ 149), 585" SOHC

   

67gt350

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 46
    • View Profile
Re: 68 Shelby GT-500 Convertible Project and Retrospective
« Reply #49 on: October 13, 2017, 10:07:23 AM »
All blasting procedures have there drawback that's where doing your research and asking fellow enthusiasts pays off then deciding what works best for you. I had my 70 Mustang blasted with sand by a friend who has done several cars. He used an industrial blaster but was very skilled with it - no warping. However cleaning out the sand was a nightmare! I have used Eastwood epoxy and like it but would like to make everyone aware of  the epoxy primers available from Southern Polyurethanes. Really cool product- allows for seven days to recoat, apply body fillers, or topcoat. Jay I am with you on leaving as much good original sheet metal as possible especially on quarter panels. I used a full reproduction quarter on my 68 fastback and the lines were terrible! I cut and reshaped much of it to match the passengers side which was original.

67gt350

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 46
    • View Profile
Re: 68 Shelby GT-500 Convertible Project and Retrospective
« Reply #50 on: October 13, 2017, 10:12:10 AM »
I forgot to mention if you do put the car on a rotisserie you can build some simple braces that triangulate between the upper/lower door hinges and the door striker like a V. You can buy them but for the cost of some material and your skill it wouldn't take long to fabricate a set which would add some strength.

Heo

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1365
    • View Profile
Re: 68 Shelby GT-500 Convertible Project and Retrospective
« Reply #51 on: October 13, 2017, 11:37:09 AM »
I don't know how the glass is but with sand and moisture I'm with Dough.
If there is some sand collected somewhere it collects moisture and rusts
I did a lot of rust repairs for a couple of decades and found a lot of moisture traps.
I did a 60 impala 2 dr ht  that must have been some Beach Cruiser in California.
Floor inside the car and trunk was like new with nice white original paint
Roof above driprail was like lace due to sand accumulated under the chrome trim
and on the inside of the roof   Wheel well openings was filled with same white fine sand
and rusted out
Normal for a 59-60 chevy is they rust in bottom of A-pillar in what i call the compost
where leafs and such from air intake gathers, The floor , trunk floor and rocker panels.
This one was like new there

And nothing beats the feeling riding in a sandblasted convertible..the crushing sound of
sand between your teethand the blinding pain of sand in your eye when you hit 50 mph :o ;D ;D



« Last Edit: October 13, 2017, 11:45:50 AM by Heo »

cjshaker

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2165
    • View Profile
Re: 68 Shelby GT-500 Convertible Project and Retrospective
« Reply #52 on: October 13, 2017, 02:46:04 PM »
Again, I'm not trying to be a jerk, just help somebody avoid any future problems based on my experience.
"Absorb" is probably the wrong term to use. Sand does not absorb moisture, but rather traps it, or more accurately, allows moisture to attach itself to it. Glass beads do the same thing, although not quite as bad. I have the same issues about keeping the glass dry with my glass bead cabinet. And glass is finer than sand, so it gets trapped easier in the small areas and crevices and is even more difficult to get out. But enough of that.  :-X :-X

I'm going to double down on my statement of getting rid of it all though. That stuff will find a way into your paint if it isn't completely removed, and I mean completely. It's amazing how 150 lbs of compressed air seems to have a difficult time dislodging that stuff, but yet 15-20 lbs from a spray gun can bring that stuff out of nothingness, seemingly by the handful! >:(  I really hate blasting, but it's a necessary evil.

And I agree on the replacement panels. I haven't seen one yet that fit like a factory piece.

Doug Smith

'69 R-code Mach 1, 1965 427 MR Sideoiler 2x4, 4-spd Toploader, 4.30 Detroit Locker
2 1965 Galaxies with 390s
1970 F-350 390
1958 Ford Ranch Wagon 390

jayb

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5454
    • View Profile
    • FE Power
Re: 68 Shelby GT-500 Convertible Project and Retrospective
« Reply #53 on: October 13, 2017, 03:18:18 PM »
I will certainly try to get rid of all the sand (glass, whatever).  I don't want it in my paint, that's for sure.  I have a couple local guys telling me that I'll never get rid of all of it, though.  We'll see...
Jay Brown
- 1969 Mach 1, Drag Week 2005 Winner NA/BB, 511" FE (10.60s @ 129); Drag Week 2007 Runner-Up PA/BB, 490" Supercharged FE (9.35 @ 151)
- 1964 Ford Galaxie, Drag Week 2009 Winner Modified NA (9.50s @ 143), 585" SOHC
- 1969 Shelby Clone, Drag Week 2015 Winner Modified NA (Average 8.98 @ 149), 585" SOHC

   

mbrunson427

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 114
    • View Profile
Re: 68 Shelby GT-500 Convertible Project and Retrospective
« Reply #54 on: October 13, 2017, 04:44:13 PM »
One of my favorite products that I'm waiting on the EPA to ban is Sikkens Rally Black spray paint. They sell this black spray paint that I love to use for engine compartments. The way it applies makes an amateur (me) look like a respectable painter. I'm not sure the chemical make-up of it, but when you spray it you're kind of wondering if you should be using a respirator. Waiting on the folks in DC to find a problem with it.

67gt350

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 46
    • View Profile
Re: 68 Shelby GT-500 Convertible Project and Retrospective
« Reply #55 on: October 13, 2017, 07:24:10 PM »
Yeah the government and EPA get involved they kill a lot of great products that work! The red oxide epoxy that I used for two builds got discontinued the replacement product didn't work as well and was only available in gray >:(!

cjetmech

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 90
    • View Profile
Re: 68 Shelby GT-500 Convertible Project and Retrospective
« Reply #56 on: October 14, 2017, 06:48:15 AM »
All blasting procedures have there drawback that's where doing your research and asking fellow enthusiasts pays off then deciding what works best for you. I had my 70 Mustang blasted with sand by a friend who has done several cars. He used an industrial blaster but was very skilled with it - no warping. However cleaning out the sand was a nightmare! I have used Eastwood epoxy and like it but would like to make everyone aware of  the epoxy primers available from Southern Polyurethanes. Really cool product- allows for seven days to recoat, apply body fillers, or topcoat. Jay I am with you on leaving as much good original sheet metal as possible especially on quarter panels. I used a full reproduction quarter on my 68 fastback and the lines were terrible! I cut and reshaped much of it to match the passengers side which was original.

X2 on SPI products. I've used just about everything they make and imo its all the best on the market. But the Epoxy primer is just incredible stuff. I know Rusty Gillis is a big fan of their stuff and maybe he'll get on here with more info. Certainly something to try out. The prices are great and so is the customer support too. Loving this project tho Jay.
67 Fairlane GT 428
93 Mustang Coupe 331

Drew Pojedinec

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1086
    • View Profile
Re: 68 Shelby GT-500 Convertible Project and Retrospective
« Reply #57 on: October 14, 2017, 07:43:53 AM »
Two thoughts:

-You should wear a respirator while painting
-There isn't really an EPA anymore, because I guess that is what "the people" wanted.

jayb

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5454
    • View Profile
    • FE Power
Re: 68 Shelby GT-500 Convertible Project and Retrospective
« Reply #58 on: October 14, 2017, 08:36:34 AM »
Did I say something that implied I wasn't wearing a respirator while painting?  Of course I was, it would be foolish not to...
Jay Brown
- 1969 Mach 1, Drag Week 2005 Winner NA/BB, 511" FE (10.60s @ 129); Drag Week 2007 Runner-Up PA/BB, 490" Supercharged FE (9.35 @ 151)
- 1964 Ford Galaxie, Drag Week 2009 Winner Modified NA (9.50s @ 143), 585" SOHC
- 1969 Shelby Clone, Drag Week 2015 Winner Modified NA (Average 8.98 @ 149), 585" SOHC

   

thatdarncat

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 956
    • View Profile
Re: 68 Shelby GT-500 Convertible Project and Retrospective
« Reply #59 on: October 14, 2017, 09:14:27 AM »
Did I say something that implied I wasn't wearing a respirator while painting?  Of course I was, it would be foolish not to...

One of the other replies.
Kevin Rolph

1967 Cougar Drag Car ( under constuction )
1966 7 litre Galaxie
1966 Country Squire 390
1966 Cyclone GT 390
1968 Torino GT 390
1972 Gran Torino wagon
1978 Lincoln Mk V