Author Topic: Extreme (real) pro stock  (Read 810 times)

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fekbmax

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Extreme (real) pro stock
« on: May 12, 2022, 02:07:57 PM »
Sorry for sharing. 
« Last Edit: May 20, 2022, 10:20:24 AM by fekbmax »
Keith.  KB MAX Racing.

gregaba

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Re: Extreme (real) pro stock
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2022, 12:46:16 PM »
That was a close race but I quit warching NHRA when they mandated Pro Stock use chevy engines no matter what body you have.
Does the PDRA have the same rule?
Greg

fekbmax

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Re: Extreme (real) pro stock
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2022, 04:17:25 PM »
These are all big inch mountain motor engines.  Normally in the range of 825 to 914 CID. Carbureted . This is very general but most of the ford bodied cars use either John Kasse or Billy Albert's engines with 5" bore spacing, 12" deck hight and 5"+ bores and use Kasse hemi style heads based of off the Boss heads. The GM cars normally run Sonny's engines with the GM simi hemi heads. All of these builders (and others) have also built the other brand's but for 30+ years Kasse has been mainly associated with ford and Sonny's with GM. Like I said this is general. Much more to the story, but Kasse has built some mean GM based engines and Sonny's has built some good running ford based engines. 
Keith.  KB MAX Racing.

gregaba

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Re: Extreme (real) pro stock
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2022, 05:16:08 PM »
Thanks for the info. I wasn't sure of the rules and John Kasse builds some great Ford engine's.
Greg

FrozenMerc

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Re: Extreme (real) pro stock
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2022, 02:49:38 PM »
Yeah,  Pretty tough to call these "Ford" or "Chevy" motors.  There is some geometry that is similar to or derived from parts of the 385 and BBC engines, but everything is bigger, all billet, and very highly engineered.  Honestly, they have as much in common with a Mack 998 V8 as a Ford 460 V8.




machoneman

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Re: Extreme (real) pro stock
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2022, 08:19:24 AM »
Nice pic of that Boss engine.

The Pro Stock era was great long ago with true steel bodied (roof/quarters) and reinforced chassis (roll cage). But, much as Jenkins full tube chassis radically changed the class, it ultimately lead to the slow demise of this once popular class.

Dyno's SOHC Maverick, Landy's hemi Dodge, Jenkin's '68 Camaro, all looked like the car you could buy, save the race engine! Today though the bodies don't even look like the street car they are supposed to be patterned on. Oh, and 500 CID engines with zero parts that would fit on any OEM engine? Chevy engines in Mustangs?

I do blame the NHRA for the majority of the poor decisions that have now caused the class to not be run at every National event as had been the case for decades. Stick a fork in it as it is done with little fan appreciation nor participation as they head for the food stands when the Pro cars run. Sad but true and I do not miss all those Camaros at all. 
« Last Edit: May 20, 2022, 02:18:47 PM by machoneman »
Bob Maag

MeanGene

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Re: Extreme (real) pro stock
« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2022, 09:28:49 AM »
Pro Stock went to hell when the put in the big weight breaks to allow Jenkins' Vega to "win"- they even admitted they did it to please the Chebby fans on their website

machoneman

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Re: Extreme (real) pro stock
« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2022, 10:18:09 AM »
Ye, they did! The all-powerful 351C cars (too many to list) suffered weight breaks, at one point, every single outing. Chrysler/Dodge also go the same "treatment" to a lesser extent, all to please the GM crowd. Glidden and Nicholson mentioned the once a week changes to the 351C cars was to prevent the Fords from quickly using de-stroked (lesser CID) engines. Didn't work as the top runners did indeed have small(er) CID short blocks ready to go and could, even at the track, swap on their latest heads/intakes. The Hemi crowd had fewer options but did use de-stroked 396 CID Hemis.

Ah, but when all those shenanigans failed to please the Chevy crowd and didn't work, voila! Outlaw the small CID engines and start using 500 CID engines. Glidden still killed those Camaros with his all-conquering Boss 429 based engines but when he hung it up, it became an all Chevy (engine and car) feast. Hence, the waning interest today in all things Pro Stock.

NHRA got what it wanted but at what price? Fools, one and all.   
« Last Edit: May 21, 2022, 10:22:17 AM by machoneman »
Bob Maag

machoneman

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Re: Extreme (real) pro stock
« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2022, 10:28:43 AM »
Here's a long but very thorough explanation of my post above. Late 2021 article btw. Well worth reading.

https://www.competitionplus.com/drag-racing/news/1488-flashback-friday-pounds-cubic-headache-the-days-500-inch-ps
Bob Maag

gregaba

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Re: Extreme (real) pro stock
« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2022, 06:21:37 PM »
Enjoyed the artical.
I soured on the NHRA back in the 70's and 80's when every time we would go to race we would have to go though a nit picking inspection on whatever Ford that we were running and if we won we would have to go though a complete teardown which the chevy's and mopar's didn't.
Joined the AHRA when they started and it was a lot better after that.
Later decided to go road racing and never looked back. Should have never started drag racing but I grew up in a drag racing family and just stuck with it as long as I could stand it.
Greg